2010-11 Tuition Rates

Rates for in-state undergraduates

College of Arts and Sciences: $7,018

College of Engineering and Applied Science: $9,746

College of Business: $11,220

College of Music: $7,282

School of Journalism and Mass Communication: $7,282


Rates for incoming, out-of-state undergraduates

College of Arts and Sciences: $28,000

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences: $30,400

College of Business: $31,500

College of Music: $28,300

School of Journalism and Mass Communication: $28,300


Rates for in-state graduates

College of Arts and Sciences: $8,928

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences: $11,682

College of Business: $12,798

College of Music: $8,928

School of Journalism and Mass Communication: $8,928

Master's in Business Administration: $13,284

First-year law: $27,702

Second-year law: $24,264

Third-year law: $22,806


Rates for out-of-state graduates

College of Arts and Sciences: $24,048

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences: $26,244

College of Business: $27,018

College of Music: $24,318

School of Journalism and Mass Communication: $24,318

Master's in Business Administration: $27,432

Law: $33,930


DENVER — University of Colorado regents, resigned to balancing the school’s budget, voted 8-1 Monday to raise tuition by 9 percent for in-state undergraduates.

Tuition for Colorado students in the College of Arts and Sciences, which is CU-Boulder’s largest school, will be $7,018 next year, up $572.

“I don’t really like this, but it’s reality,” said Regent Tillie Bishop, R-Grand Junction. “We either close our doors or look to our students and parents for the help we need.“

Regent Tom Lucero, R-Berthoud, cast the lone dissenting vote.

“We’re saddling the students with an unbelievable burden at this time,” he said.
CU Regent James Geddes comments on his disappointment of having to vote for an increase in tuition for the University of Colorado during a Budget Committee
CU Regent James Geddes comments on his disappointment of having to vote for an increase in tuition for the University of Colorado during a Budget Committee meeting at Tivoli Student Union in Denver, Colorado March 29, 2010. CAMERA/Mark Leffingwell (MARK LEFFINGWELL)


CU-Boulder student Mary Mekeal started saving for college in elementary school, socking away her allowance. She now juggles a few jobs: coaching tennis, working as a cashier at the student Recreation Center, and has another gig in the CU Theater box office. She also earns scholarships to help cover her in-state tuition.

Eventually, she expects she’ll need to add more hours to her work week and find cheaper housing. For now, she said she’ll dig deeper into her savings to cover the increases. 

Regents also approved a 5 percent tuition increase for incoming, out-of-state students, which raises rates to $28,000 for those in the College of Arts and Sciences. CU offers a “guaranteed” tuition for its non-residents, which locks in rates for four years. 

Gov. Bill Ritter set a cap for public Colorado colleges and universities this year that prevents them from raising tuition beyond 9 percent.

University officials say they need to raise tuition that much to help offset deep budget cuts from the state. Over the decade, state support for CU-Boulder has decreased 60 percent, while tuition has increased 156 percent for in-state students.

CU faces a potential shortfall of $2,600 for each student, and revenue from the tuition increase will cover only 20 percent of that, according to finance officials. 

Regent Jim Geddes, R-Sedalia, said he begrudgingly approved this year’s increase, but wants CU to explore alternative funding so that tuition doesn’t shoot up again next year.

“I am not going to vote next year for a tuition increase,” Geddes pledged. “I feel we cannot further burden students in this matter.”
   
Regents said they were reluctant to raise tuition amid a soft economy, when families’ earning potential is weakening and students have a tough time finding additional work.

“You kind of hold your nose and vote to keep the university afloat,” said Bishop, prior to the vote.

Regent Michael Carrigan, D-Denver, described the funding crisis as “Colorado’s chronic failure” to support its colleges.

“I will reluctantly support this tuition increase,” he said.

Carrigan asked that Colorado students and families join the university in its efforts to secure more state funding.

“I think the era of a student being able to put him or herself through college is coming to an end,” said Regent Stephen Ludwig, D-Lone Tree. 

Hannah Ehrlich transferred to CU from Ohio Wesleyan University so that she could save money by paying in-state tuition at a public university.

“I think instead of raising tuition the Colorado government needs to quit cutting funds since we are dead last in higher-education funding,” she said.

She receives need-based federal financial aid, and if her scholarships don’t keep pace with the tuition increases it could be a “breaking point” since she pays for her education without help from her parents, she said.

“It will absolutely be a strain on me,” said Ehrlich, an integrative physiology major who expects to earn her bachelor’s degree with an estimated $20,000 in debt. 

CU accounting major Andrew Birney, of Evergreen, said he’ll be unscathed by the increase, since his parents pay his tuition.

His older brother attended college out of state, with tuition costing $40,000 a year, so his in-state tuition is much more affordable, he said.

Regent Joe Neguse, D-Boulder, introduced a measure that would direct CU to invest more than 20 percent of revenue generated from tuition increases into financial aid, but the measure failed. Twenty percent is the minimum required by the state. 

In the next week, CU will announce another $21 million in budget-balancing measures. The 5 percent pay cut that top administrators took last year will continue this year.

Even with the revenue from tuition increases, CU still faces a $50 million deficit, according to CU financial chief Kelly Fox.

Regents also agreed to raise tuition for in-state graduate students by 9 percent and out-of-state graduate students by 3 percent. Resident tuition will increase 15 percent for incoming, first-year law students, 10.5 percent for second-year law students and 11.6 percent for third-year students. All out-of-state law students will face a 7.3 percent increase.

Contact Camera Staff Writer Brittany Anas at 303-473-1132 or anasb@dailycamera.com.