Dressy Bessy’s latest, Kingsized
Dressy Bessy's latest, Kingsized (Evan Semon / The Denver Post)

Attention live music lovers! Locals Live is back at Innisfree and we are kicking off 2016 with a live performance from local singer-songwriter Makenna Moorethis on Thursday from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.! Come to Innisfree, drink coffee, support local music and hang out with Radio 1190!

In the early 1990s, Denver was home to the premier psychedelic pop record label Elephant 6 whose roster included Olivia Tremor Control and Of Montreal. But one of the gems of their roster was a longtime Denver act called Dressy Bessy. The group has been consistently releasing classic power-pop tinged records since 1996, and in 2016 they released Kingsized, their seventh full-length studio album. Though their sound is quite poppy, the group put enough grit and dirt into the mix to make a truly rocking record. While their sound doesn't bring much innovative or new to the table, is chock-full of personality and wit. For a long-running group like Dressy Bessy, Kingsized is a fantastic addition to their stellar discography.

Sam Ray is a Baltimore-based multi-instrumentalist who has released a collection of records that may put Ty Segall to shame. Under names such as Ricky Eat Acid and Teen Suicide, Ray has been able to bring lo-fi music spanning genres from rock to electronic to the underground via Internet-based platforms such as Bandcamp and Tumblr.

Julia Brown, one of his most celebrated projects, has gotten the reissue treatment from Joy Void Records. The re-released record, An Abundance of Strawberries, is a more acoustic approach for Ray, but still packs all the off-the-cuff, emotional punch that his other releases contain. Though this record is a little more on the poppier side than his drug-addled sound with Teen Suicide, the pop is served up with a dirty, contorted twist that remains off-putting and interesting. Even if you're not a fan of Sam Ray, or lo-fi in general, An Abundance of Strawberries is a great place to get acquainted with the artist and the genre .


One of the most accessible outings from filmmaker David Lynch was the 1986 film "Blue Velvet," scored by the fantastic Angelo Badalamenti. Now in 2016, a documentary of unreleased, behind the scenes footage from the set of the movie has been released, aptly titled "Blue Velvet Revisited."

The soundtrack is composed by two interesting acts, Tuxedomoon and A Cult With No Name — the former being a post-punk act and the latter being an ambient duo. This is not a remake of the original film's soundtrack, but still captures the same broody, atmospheric score from Angelo Badalamenti. The jazz-influenced ambient album is incredibly interesting on the whole and even incorporates sounds from classical and post punk. "Blue Velvet Revisited" is a fantastic interpretation of the original score and sounds just as good as the original.

Calvet is the music director at Radio 1190. Read more reviews: coloradodaily.com/columnists