Freeman
Freeman

Theirs two big of a differents between you're bad righting and my perfect writing, butt its to difcult four me too explain.

OK, the serious grammar people may have punched their monitors, thrown their phones against the wall or crumpled up the actual newspaper.

I tell my students that everybody makes mistakes. I do, the New York Times does and maybe even J.K. Rowling also goofs up here and there. Writing correctly is important whether it's a text, tweet, email or a birthday card to your grandma.

Some people won't return messages with bad grammar or spelling. Fancy-pants foodies snarl a bit when restaurants misspell menus. I bang my head against my desk whenever my flub-ups make it into the public eye — that is assuming that people actually read this column.

This isn't a column about how "back in my day, I walked 12 miles through snowbanks to write in perfect penmanship AND grammar on an old-style chalk blackboard."

Stop me if you've heard this before, but I can't stand my boss. Not my Colorado Daily editor; she's a gem. No, my boss at my "real job." This dickhead probably needs shoulder surgery from patting himself on the back. He likes to remind me that he's worked as a technical writer for 20 years, nobody showed him how to do anything and he's spoonfeeding me while holding my hand in order to train me.


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Honestly, I'm not a great technical writer. I'm assigned a project, have a little bit of time to become an expert and then write about it. I don't really care about mortgage stuff or power plants. I hate doing research, and my attention span isn't keen enough to focus on things I don't understand — which is a lot of what I write about.

True story: My boss is better than me at some things — except grammar, spelling and consistency. I spend most of my time editing his damn work. My boss thinks it's a waste of time and says, "They're just little mistakes."

Yeah, maybe using "grey" instead of "gray" might not ruffle most people's tail feathers. But there is a huge difference between "that coffee costs $5" and "that coffee costs $55."

With his writing, I don't even know what's correct and what's a misspelling. Random words get capitalized or hyphenated, sometimes in different ways on the same page. Maybe nobody gives a shit if "Insurance Rate Law HOK12" is written as "Insurance-rate law HOK 12," but that could be a huge deal in these training manuals.

They barely pay me enough to point out these problems — and definitely not enough to solve all of them. They're lucky I stay awake for my shift.

In journalism school, we learn that if a newspaper doesn't know the difference between their, there and they're, why should the public trust their info?

Whats teh morel of this colum? Pay attention two whats coming out of you're fingers. SpelLCheck and grammar check everything ewe right, and than look it over again. Yes, everything you write.

Cause You're friends ant family certanely wont like ewe Much if you mispell there names In-Correctly oar ascend a birthday cart too Ann a dress thats knot there's.

Read more Freeman: coloradodaily.com/columns. Stalk him: comfyconfines.wordpress.com