Tin Shed Sports

What: Bikes, skis and coffee

Opened: May, 2012

Where: 112 E. 2nd St., Nederland

More info: tinshedsports.com/

The clock tower above Salto Coffee Works and Tin Shed Sports can be seen from almost anywhere in Nederland.

To co-owner Marcus Luscher, the clock tower serves as more than just a beacon directing patrons to his business. It symbolizes a meeting place for locals and tourists alike, a community gathering point illuminated at night.

"In Europe, the clock tower is always the meeting area, a focal point in town and that's one of the reasons I wanted to have it," Luscher said.

Luscher and wife Karina Luscher hope to combine two European staples in their new venture: bikes and espresso. But the husband-wife duo wants their joint shops to be more personal, less business. Their hope is that Nederlandians and tourists will call Tin Shed Sports and Salto Coffee Works home after a long, cold day skiing or riding up Boulder Canyon.

The pair opened the shop in May 2012, and said business has been growing steadily as word spreads from locals to tourists about their new community meeting center at 112 E. 2nd St.

Karina Luscher runs day-to-day operations on the coffee side, preparing French pressed coffee and other specialty drinks. Salto is also open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and has a selection of local beers on tap.


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Over on the Tin Shed Sports side, the couple's longtime friend Josh Harrod serves as general manager, overseeing bike, ski and outdoor gear sales, tunes and repairs.

One of the shop's walls is a garage door that Harrod leaves open during the summer months. The door opens up to a patio enclosed on two sides by the "L" shaped building, and serves as a meeting place for organized evening rides and events.

On a snowy December morning at Salto, Dave Kingsbury and Kim Johnson edited a documentary film next to the shop's warm fireplace. Kingsbury, a vice president at New Hope Natural Media, owns seven bikes, which he uses to commute to Boulder from Nederland everyday.

A combination bike and coffee shop in Nederland appeals to all of his interests, Kingsbury said, which means he spends a good chunk of each day at the shop. Instead of driving to Boulder to find a quiet coffeehouse to work from, he's been able to stay closer to home. Some days, Kingsbury said, he stops in both before and after skiing or cycling.

"On a good day, three times," he said, laughing. "Now we have a really cool place to hang out. This is a really chill place. You've got healthy food and a fireplace, and we can come here and do relatively serious work. We're lucky."

Sandi Betters, a 3-D architectural rendering consultant, and friend Katie Jagt, a civil and environmental engineer, sat at a high table made from reclaimed wood, working on their laptops.

Betters, who coaches a youth mountain bike team and the Eldora Mountain Ski and Snowboard club, said she comes to Salto and Tin Shed Sports at least four times a week.

"It's been sweet because it is a place that everybody comes to," said Betters, while sipping a hot chocolate, a diversion from her usual black coffee. "It's more of a community stop than it even is coffee."

The legs of the table the two were perched at are crossbows from telephone poles on the Peak to Peak highway, said Harrod. The rocks that comprise the fireplace are from Caribou, a ghost town west of Nederland famous for its silver mine.

Both the interior and exterior building features -- like the clock tower and inviting fireplace -- were designed with the two shops' ultimate goal in mind: to become "the place" where everyone in Nederland gathers for camaraderie, food and sport.

"The goal is to create a community-based hub for everybody," Harrod said. "We just wanted to be this gathering place where (people can) ride, coffee, ride, ski. Nederland has never really had a place like this."

--Follow Sarah Kuta on Twitter: @SarahKuta.