If you go

Who: Wavves, The Photo Atlas, POPCULT, Shaky Molars
When: 9 p.m. Thursday
Where: Moe's Original Bar B Que, 3295 S Broadway, Englewood
Cost: $12-$15
More info: moesdenver.com/event/68295

The lead singer of Denver's Shaky Molars -- a band who describes their sound as wild, flirty pop -- calls himself as more of a "lead flirter" than lead singer.

"Flirting is fun," Chuck Potashner said. We formed a band so we could fill up rooms with strangers for me to flirt with. The rest of the band is there to make me look like less of a creeper."

The story of Shaky Molars is, of course, more complex than that. Potashner wanted to form what he called an ABBA-influenced western swing band while living in San Diego, but decided that sound didn't fit the garage rock scene that dominated there. He couch-surfed his way back to Denver, where he tried a psychedelic surf pop sound instead. That didn't work either.

"That also fell flat. I have no control over what I'm creating," he said.

Potashner met guitarist Nate Adelmann while -- what else? -- flirting with him at Astroland. They crossed paths again the next night at Larimer Lounge.

"He moved in and started playing in the band, and it turns out I don't like him at all," Potashner joked. "Luckily for him, the dude can really rip. It's his only redeeming quality."


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Slowly, a band started forming around him. The current roster includes Potashner on vocals and guitar, Kat Roscoe on bass, Kayla Martin on cello, Lora Bird on bassoon, Meghan Hainer on violin, Nate Adelmann on lead guitar, and Ryan Mulligan on drums.

Until very recently -- this week, in fact -- Shaky Molars could only be heard at live shows. But on October 2, they announced that they "lied" about never recording and are in the studio now.

"I was tired of booking agents and bloggers bugging us for recordings," Potashner said. "We're producing and releasing our recordings ourselves, and will continue to do so until some record label pries creative control from our pretentious, DIY-obsessed fingers."

Shaky Molars writes it's music as a group, though the lyrics are all Potashner, and the final result definitely fits the band's self-description. Potashner is a bit self-deprecating, saying their chord progressions only follow the standards of pop music that have existed forever, but he also believes he's bringing something different to the Denver scene.

"Denver had enough computer-based hype electronic bands producing recordings first and then doing karaoke with strobe lights live," he said. "So we decided to take our music the opposite direction, with songs we can actually play."

The band also makes toothbrushes you can actually use. No joke. They're blue, they say Shaky Molars on them, and there's a second line to come.

Between designing toothbrushes, recording a debut album and keeping up with live shows, it'd seem Shaky Molars have their hands full. But there's still room for scheming.

"We also plan to declare war on our two least favorite Denver acts and have kinky sex with our two favorites," he said. "Bands that sleep together play sold-out shows together. Fact."

Those favorites better pick up those toothbrushes and clean themselves up. The least favorites, maybe grab some and sharpen them? Everyone else, stay tuned.