We got some letters while I was gone. Among them: a student asks for the dining halls to stay open later and another student pledges to be more considerate of neighbors -- and refers to public urination twice in a short space:

"Living next to college students is definitely not an easy thing. They are not only very loud but sometimes they break a lot of laws. I've heard many stories of my friends urinating on their neighbors' lawns, throwing cups and just making a scene. This is not fair to the other families. How could you raise a kid in an area where college students are urinating everywhere?"

Everywhere?

Man. Ignorance was bliss.

I've been thinking about the ongoing reputation battle that CU is waging. You know, the one against the perception that it's a big ol' drug school, and the one against the 10,000-strong pot-themed gathering that happens annually. The one that has CU studying how other schools handle similar drug-party-related issues. Know why I've been thinking about it? Because I keep seeing tweets like these:

Those are public tweets. And I never would have seen them if it weren't for the fact that they were also hashtagged and drawn to my attention because I follow things that happen at CU and on Boulder. I'm just kind of surprised by that, I guess.


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Maybe this isn't all that rational, but it makes me want to gather a few things together and get my mind off of public urination and pot and... Jersey Shore.

So I did.

Not too long ago, I asked our Facebook page what any of our readers had sent into space recently, inspired by the Boulder-built tool that was just shot into space on NASA's Mars rover, Curiosity. Guy in charge of that has an M.S. and Ph. D. in physics from the University of Colorado. (By the way, unrelated, this was before the Natty Light became the first beer in space.)

In November, CU researchers received a Governor's Award for High Impact Research and two CU profs were honored as Fulbright Scholars.

And of course, the university keeps a long list of rankings and awards (druggiest is not on the list -- I checked). So there you go.

So Wheelchair Sports Camp got a huge profile in the Village Voice (New York). They're a Denver hip-hop crew:

Kalyn Heffernan is 24 years old, weighs 53 pounds, and measures three feet, six inches tall. She's light enough to carry, compact enough to hide under a winter coat, and is sometimes mistaken for a child. But Kalyn, who has the brittle-bone disability osteogenesis imperfecta, is hardly innocent, precious, or inconspicuous: The Colorado native dabbles in graffiti, cusses gloriously, and has a septum piercing. She raps, scribbles rhymes, and has been known to cover the viral YouTube video "My Vagina Ain't Handicapped." If you ask-and even if you don't-she'll eagerly lift her shirt to show off the words "CRIP LIFE" inked on her stomach, an homage to Tupac Shakur's THUG LIFE tattoo.

Here's a promo video for the band:

She was also one of several Denver hip-hop artists to appear on "99th Problem," meant to be an Occupy anthem. Here's that song:

LIGHTNING ROUND. Nice hat. Jeff Bridges playing peek-a-boo. Here's a drawing. Read this comic. From the beginning. And read the one that appears in our paper by a guy in Denver. Cool Valmont Bike Park photo.

Have a nice day.