Jessica and Piper Catlin, of Boulder, trained hard this year and beat their previous time by two minutes.

"She holds my hand," Jessica Catlin said of her 12-year-old daughter. "When one of us gets tired, the other one pulls us forward."

Isabel Scott and Dee Ann Wolfe, of Parker, hardly trained at all.

Their goal was simply to finish the race in honor of Scott's son, Joseph Scott, who is deployed in Afghanistan. They planned to share the pictures with him over Skype on Monday evening.

Brenna McFadden ran dressed as the Hulk with other members of the girls cross-country team from Kearney, Neb., all dressed as superheroes (and a few villains). There was Superwoman and Catwoman, Captain America and Batman.

"The atmosphere is great," McFadden said. "We love it."

They were among the tens of thousands of runners who converged on Boulder on Monday morning for the 35th running of the Bolder Boulder, the city's much-loved Memorial Day 10K. According to race officials, 48,741 people registered for this year's race -- down from 51,681 last year, a drop organizers say could be attributed to the after-affects of the Boston Marathon bombings.

Boulder's Jeremy Freed won the men's citizens race in 30 minutes, 57.6 seconds. Another local, Lidia Simon, of Boulder, won the women's citizens race, finishing 46th overall with a time of 34:04.59.

Wheelchair racer Scott Parson won his second consecutive Bolder Boulder, finishing in 24:29. Susannah Scaroni, of Champaign, Ill., finished first for the women wheelchair racers with a time of 26:06.

And Allan Kiprono, of Kenya, won the men's elite race with a time of 29:29, according to race officials. Merima Mohammed, of Ethiopia, won the women's elite race with a time of 33:59.

Increased security

Jeremy Freed of Boulder, at center, prepares to overtake Lee Troop, left, and Brandon Birdsong, right, as Freed wins the Citizens Race of the 2013 Bolder
Jeremy Freed of Boulder, at center, prepares to overtake Lee Troop, left, and Brandon Birdsong, right, as Freed wins the Citizens Race of the 2013 Bolder Boulder. (Paul Aiken / Daily Camera)

This year's running of the Bolder Boulder came with new and unprecedented security procedures following the Boston bombings earlier this spring, an attack that killed three and injured more than 140.

Spectators bringing items into Folsom Field for the finish were limited to soft-sided bags no larger than 12 inches by 12 inches by 12 inches -- and those bags were searched. Police used metal detectors to "wand" all people coming in to Folsom Field -- including vendors -- and spectators were made to pour out any water or beverages that weren't sealed.

Security lines, though, were short and moved quickly.

Boulder police spokeswoman Kim Kobel said police had extra dispatchers on duty to deal with calls about unattended bags. However, they received only a handful of reports, all of which turned out to be clothes left by racers.

Course volunteers walk to their positions near the 4 mile mark before the start of the Bolder Boulder on Monday, May 26, 2013.
Course volunteers walk to their positions near the 4 mile mark before the start of the Bolder Boulder on Monday, May 26, 2013. (Mark Leffingwell / Daily Camera)

"I think people listened to us when we requested their cooperation," she said.

CU-Boulder police spokesman Ryan Huff similarly reported that security operations went smoothly. Procedures were similar to those followed at commencement earlier this month and are likely to continue for the foreseeable future.

"With the Boston Marathon bombing and today's current conditions, you will probably see this in years to come as well," he said. "We certainly appreciate the public's cooperation in packing light and limiting what they bring."

The legacy of the Boston bombings was visible on runners' bodies, as well, with some people sporting "Boston Strong" or "We Run for Boston" T-shirts.

Jon Johannsen of Centennial runs out front of the start of the 2013 Bolder Boulder on Monday, May 27, 2013.
Jon Johannsen of Centennial runs out front of the start of the 2013 Bolder Boulder on Monday, May 27, 2013. (Paul Aiken / Daily Camera)

Huff said there were a total of 125 medical contacts at the stadium, slightly more than normal, with most calls related to the heat.

Eleven people were taken to area hospitals, including a 63-year-old male runner who suffered a "cardiac issue" near Folsom and Grove streets around 8:40 a.m. Kobel said paramedics performed CPR on the man before he was transported to the hospital, but he was alert and with his family later in the day.

Paramedics responded to a second cardiac arrest and a stroke later in the day, neither fatal.

'A fun family vacation'

As it does every year, the race drew longtime partisans who never miss the Bolder Boulder and new runners enticed by its reputation.

Drew Chiacchieri dressed as a cartoon character at the Bolder Boulder this morning.
Drew Chiacchieri dressed as a cartoon character at the Bolder Boulder this morning. (Paul Aiken / Daily Camera)

Bill Obert, 74, of Conifer, has been running the Bolder Boulder since 1985. He started running at age 30 after having one of his kidneys removed, and he hasn't stopped since.

"The doctor told me I needed to stay in shape," he said.

He runs eight to 10 races a year, but the Bolder Boulder is his favorite, he said.

"I like the crowds," he said. "I like how it's organized. I don't know what happened to the belly dancers, though."

(They were there when the first wave passed soon after 7 a.m., so they must have run out of steam or taken a break.)

"You always see what a big event it is and an iconic event," said Jerry Buza, of Los Angeles. "I thought I should do it."

Buza ran with his sister, Cari Laitsch, of Cortez, and her daughter, Heather Wu. All three wore "runs in the family" T-shirts.

"It makes for a fun family vacation," Laitsch said.

Laitsch, who started running three years ago, hopes to qualify for the Boston Marathon next year.

Kent Coghill and Chris Dirolf, wildland firefighters with Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks, ran the race in costume as Lorenzo the Bear and Coyote Bob.

At any point during the race, did they wonder what they were thinking, donning complete animal costumes?

"Before it even started," they said.

But the suffering is worth it, they said, for the reaction they get from kids lined up along the race route.

"We do it for the kids," they said.

Cam McWilliam, of Scotland, ran the race in a full-body "morphsuit" that covered even his face with the blue and white colors of his country's flag.

Asked if there was any advantage, perhaps some aerodynamic benefit, to his suit, McWilliam said, "None. None at all. I'm very hot. I'm soaked."

McWilliam moved to Denver six months ago, and everyone told him he had to run the Bolder Boulder.

"Everyone said it's the best run," he said.

Contact Camera Staff Writer Erica Meltzer at 303-473-1355 or meltzere@dailycamera.com.