LOS ANGELES — Video games are tricky business. With a typical development cycle lasting two to five years, it's difficult for companies to know when to release information.

Do you trickle it out over three years and risk people getting tired of hearing about your future masterpiece? Do you drop everything three months before release, thereby shortening your preorder window?

And, most important, how much do you show at the Electronic Entertainment Expo?

To me, E3 2014 felt very much like a Chicago Cubs baseball season, with only a little good news and a whole lot of "wait till next year."

Sure, some strong games are coming out this holiday season, including a disproportionate number in October, for some reason.

"Destiny," "Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare," "Battlefield: Hardline," "Disney Infinity 2.0: Marvel Super Heroes," "LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham," "Assassin's Creed Unity" and more are all on the holiday horizon.

But this year's E3 seemed to be the most forward thinking in recent memory.

Raise your hand if you are waiting for the next "Halo," "Uncharted," "Zelda" or "Batman: Arkham" game.

Now, put your hand down; you look silly.

All these games were shown or mentioned at the show, mostly in video snippets promising us a revelatory new experience — if only we can wait a little longer.

We're told the unnamed new "Zelda" game will feature a completely open world to explore, without a set order to tackle the dungeons. That's great, but we'd really like to see a little of the gameplay.

"Halo 5: Guardians" and "Uncharted 4: A Thief's End" also gave us very brief glimpses of the future — barely enough to grasp — so the anticipation is based more on previous entries than anything else.

Gamers who try the new multiplayer "Evolve" will find that four teammates can gang up on one friend playing a monster.
Gamers who try the new multiplayer "Evolve" will find that four teammates can gang up on one friend playing a monster. (Associated Press, 2K Games)

Then there are all the others: games with Kirby and Yoshi; "Dead Island 2," which no longer even takes place on an island; a new "Homefront" game that looks a million times better than the original, and on and on.

All coming in 2015.

The one bright point of all this future tech — "Batman: Arkham Knight." We actually got to play a significant portion of this game (originally intended for a fall 2014 release, it is more complete than the others).

Centered on the Ace Chemical factory, the game heavily featured the new Batmobile, showing off its capabilities as an extension of the Dark Knight himself and aiding him in solving puzzles and taking out baddies like a tank come to life.

It's difficult to say if playing this game — it has been moved to an as-yet-undetermined 2015 release date — is any better than not seeing very much of it. Those who played it really want to play it more, but none of us knows when we will get the chance.

For the record, "Batman: Arkham Knight" is absolutely my choice for Game of Show.

Developer Rocksteady claims this is its last Batman game and is determined to go out with a bang.

So, what do we take away from this year's E3?

First, developers are absolutely supporting the new generation of consoles, with full slates coming for both the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 — eventually.

Next, there really are some great games coming out soon. Publishers are even flirting with some new gameplay ideas such as asymmetric multiplayer, which (in these cases) pit four players against one.

Both "Evolve" and "Fable Legends" allow four friends playing good guys to square off against someone playing the evil force (a good role for a frenemy — just saying).

Whatever you do, don't let your new console sit there collecting dust while waiting for next year to happen. Go out and try something new, revisit an old franchise or even check out some of the myriad independent games releasing over the next few months.

And, if all else fails, grab one of the many great reissues, such as the "Halo Master Chief Collection," which allows you to play through the first four games as a seamless story experience or to dive into its 100 multiplayer maps.

There are a lot of great games out there, and the future promises even more. It's just up to you to try them out.