Thousands of naked cyclists swarm City of Brotherly Love

PHILADELPHIA — Thousands of bicyclists dared to be bare for the city's annual nude ride promoting positive body image, cycling advocacy and fuel conservation.

About 3,000 people gathered Saturday for the eighth annual Philly Naked Bike Ride through the city's streets. They set off from a park near the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where Sylvester Stallone ran up the steps in the "Rocky" movies.

The annual ride featured people sporting underwear, body paint, glitter or nothing at all. Some riders concerned about being recognized by their parents or co-workers wore masks while others wore just their shoes.

"It's a really open and fun way of destigmatizing nudity," said Oren Eisenberg, who was riding nude for the fifth time.

The 12-mile ride through the City of Brotherly Love is among many related to the World Naked Bike Ride movement. The riders pedal through the City of Brotherly Love past popular spots such as Independence Hall and Rittenhouse Square, where crowds cheer them on.

The Philly Naked Bike Ride, or PNBR, is a clothing optional bare-as-you-dare event, meaning participants can wear as much or as little as they want. Organizers say it's an invitation to be naked but they want people to be comfortable and have fun no matter how much skin they expose.


Lots of the riders sprayed or splashed on body paint or let artists, led by Matt Deifer, do it for them. Deifer said he painted hundreds of them in Wildfire Visible Luminescent Paint colors including brilliant yellow, bright orange and deep blue.

Some riders held signs with slogans promoting their causes — or painted them on their breasts and backs.

"Nude not crude! Born this way," was the message on Ben Heidari's back.

Study: Five-second rule is too generous for fallen food

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. — It might be time to reconsider the five-second rule when thinking about eating food that has fallen on the floor.

Researchers at Rutgers University in New Jersey say in a new study that bacteria can contaminate food that falls on the floor instantaneously.

The findings were published this month in the American Society for Microbiology's journal.

Researcher Donald Schaffner said the five-second rule is a "significant oversimplification of what actually happens when bacteria transfer from a surface to food."

Schaffner's research isn't the first to conclude that the favorite excuse for why that yummy snack that fell on the ground is still OK to eat is wrong.

The research did find that longer contact time means more bacterial transfer but that the type of food and surface is just as, or more, important.

The Rutgers researchers tested watermelon, bread, bread and butter, and gummy candy on stainless steel, ceramic tile, wood and carpet.

They found that watermelon had the most contamination and that transfer of bacteria is affected most by moisture.

Associated Press