University of Colorado engineering graduate students Sushma Mallikarjunaiah, 25, left, and Abdullah Aseery, 29, work on a group project Monday afternoon on the Boulder campus. Mallikarjunaiah is from India, and Aseery is from Saudi Arabia. CU wants to increase its international student body by 50 percent in the next five to 10 years.
University of Colorado engineering graduate students Sushma Mallikarjunaiah, 25, left, and Abdullah Aseery, 29, work on a group project Monday afternoon on the Boulder campus. Mallikarjunaiah is from India, and Aseery is from Saudi Arabia. CU wants to increase its international student body by 50 percent in the next five to 10 years.

BOULDER, Colo. –

The University of Colorado’s Boulder campus will try to increase its international student body by 50 percent over the next five to 10 years, interim Chancellor Phil DiStefano said.

There are 1,229 international students studying at the campus, which marks a full recovery from the post-9/11 slump, when American-bound students had problems getting visas, driver’s licenses and other required documents.

DiStefano said the school is exploring ways to “aggressively reach out to international students” as boosting foreign enrollment is among the goals of the university’s “Flagship 2030” plan. The long-term planning document seeks to better prepare students for an increasingly global workplace.

“One way to internationalize their experience is to bring the rest of the world here to campus,” said Larry Bell, director of CU’s Office of International Education.

The university doesn’t currently spend money recruiting students from overseas, but school leaders are considering making the investment. They’re also considering opening satellite campuses, possibly internationally, according to Flagship 2030.

CU has also hosted and participated in cross-global conferences this past year.

Bell said now is a good time to bolster recruitment efforts because out-of-state domestic enrollment is uncertain, as the recession causes some American families to re-think whether they can afford the more expensive tuition. International students could help buoy the possible drop in non-resident students.

“One way to internationalize their experience is to bring the rest of the world here to campus,” he said.

He said the university should look to Central and South America to recruit more students, since there’s not much representation from those regions on CU’s campus now.

CU spokesman Bronson Hilliard said other colleges and universities across the country are exploring ways to build international enrollment, and the topic was featured at a higher-education conference last week.

“It’s a key strategy for all major American public universities to really become international universities,” he said.

Following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, other countries built up their recruitment programs and capitalized on the obstacles in the United States, with Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom having national policies encouraging the recruitment of international students.

Archived comments

Wecould offer instate tuition…

jhfran@yahoo.com

4/6/2009 7:28:55 PM

They’re going after the international students because none of the American student’s parents have any money left.

meatpieandtatters

4/6/2009 7:56:35 PM

I give up.We just spent the last day looking at the effect of having an under-educated population…jobs going overseas to better educated cheaper labor (IBM/SUN).The US will be a blue collar population working for the world soon and we will be serving food in the cafeterias at our Universities to the world’s students.Losers!

rutroh

4/6/2009 8:08:04 PM

Perhaps they are looking for applicants who haven’t heard about Ward.

jhfran@yahoo.com

4/6/2009 8:10:03 PM

“Perhaps they are looking for applicants who haven’t heard about Ward.”

Priceless.

zone913inc@aol.com

4/6/2009 9:48:34 PM

I like the photo (sticker on the laptop). Matlab rules!

jgarcia@ucar.edu

4/6/2009 10:05:54 PM

Wouldn’t it be cheaper and more efficient to outsource the entire campus to another country? Apparently Americans not only don’t need jobs here, they don’t need higher education.

User_Name

4/7/2009 8:40:55 AM

As a globalization strategy, this seems reasonable and unremarkable, considering how small the current number of international students is (1229) and still would be with a 50% increase (1844).But it only underscores the likelihood they’re only doing it to get the money of those internationals.Foreign language course requirements are surely still the best way to “internationalize” the individual CU student’s experience, across the entire range of majors.And of course there are history, poli sci, world literature and other courses providing insight into the wider world and past and current world affairs.All in all, this looks to me like dumbed-down news, to go along with the dumbed-down jobs and dumbed-down citizenry globalization encourages to let second- and third-world countries “catch up” economically.CU and every other university should instead be in the business of testing and challenging the intellectual paradigms that have been failing across the board and increasingly clearly to the really best thinkers in every field.As an independent scientist, for example, I can tell you the current seeming confidence and happy talk in science (as you will be subjected to at the CWA this week) hides a long-term slide into the present crisis of fundamental honesty and competence, particularly in the earth and life sciences, but even in physics, the mother of hard sciences.

–Harry Dale Huffman

hdhuffman

4/7/2009 8:43:08 AM