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BOULDER, Colo. –

A mountain lion was tranquilized and relocated by the state Division of Wildlife after killing a small dog in Boulder’s Highland Park neighborhood on Monday, according to Boulder police.

The lion killed a “white, fluffy dog” outside 2318 Dennison St. at about 4 p.m., police said.

Division of Wildlife spokeswoman Jennifer Churchill said the lion, a 10-month-old male, was moved to a remote location. She said the lion had previously been tagged and is part of the division’s Front Range mountain study. The lion will be “hazed” to give it a negative association with humans and its movements tracked, she said.

The dog’s owner, who didn’t want to give her name, said her dog, an American Eskimo miniature, was attacked on their deck. She said she tried unsuccessfully to scare the lion to get it to drop her dog.

On Sunday, part of a Chautauqua Park trail was closed after hikers spotted a mountain lion in the trees. The female lion was monitored, but not tranquilized.

Archived comments

Great, here we go again …

KR

3/30/2009 8:47:56 PM

(Go lions!)

KR

3/30/2009 8:49:27 PM

Posted by KR on March 30, 2009 at 8:49 p.m. (Suggest removal)

(Go lions!)

******

I’m happy the lions are thriving, but they don’t need to do so by eating dogs. This is a heartless comment. Did you have the same thing to say when the lion stalked the kids outside Boulder High a decade back? Were you happy when the kids were leaving school and the lion jumped the fence and devoured and killed a kid in front of everyone? I support the wildlife in the area, but I love my dog too. I’d be heartbroken if he was eaten and had to go through the pain of being ripped apart. And the problem isn’t the dog but the overdevelopment of Boulder. Are you willing to give up your home and move to Longmont so that the lions can have more space? Somehow I doubt it.

And before you start the mass comments of disbelief, the story was well documented and can be read in Beast In the Garden.

Flyonthewall

3/30/2009 8:56:57 PM

third post!

jackstraw

3/30/2009 8:59:38 PM

leave the mountain lions alone.if you don’t want to live near wildlife, move to New York City.

msw3410

3/30/2009 9:05:41 PM

She doesn’t wanna give her name but she gave the address…

Move the MTN lion to Montana or something..so if it comes back again then you know its out for blood!

vYRaL303

3/30/2009 9:09:22 PM

Posted by msw3410 on March 30, 2009 at 9:05 p.m. (Suggest removal)

leave the mountain lions alone.

******

No one is going after the mountain lions. The mountains lions are after us because we’ve built into their area. And no one in boulder would say they’d move to longmont so that we don’t have to keep building more and more homes up the mountain.

Flyonthewall

3/30/2009 9:32:47 PM

Posted by Flyonthewall on March 30, 2009 at 8:56 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Posted by KR on March 30, 2009 at 8:49 p.m. (Suggest removal)

(Go lions!)

******

I’m happy the lions are thriving, but they don’t need to do so by eating dogs. This is a heartless comment. Did you have the same thing to say when the lion stalked the kids outside Boulder High a decade back? Were you happy when the kids were leaving school and the lion jumped the fence and devoured and killed a kid in front of everyone? I support the wildlife in the area, but I love my dog too. I’d be heartbroken if he was eaten and had to go through the pain of being ripped apart. And the problem isn’t the dog but the overdevelopment of Boulder. Are you willing to give up your home and move to Longmont so that the lions can have more space? Somehow I doubt it.

And before you start the mass comments of disbelief, the story was well documented and can be read in Beast In the Garden.

******

yes.

laughinghard

3/30/2009 9:58:58 PM

@ laughinghard *****And before you start the mass comments of disbelief, the story was well documented and can be read in Beast In the Garden.*****

Maybe I’m confused.Are you saying that a mountain lion ate a student at Boulder High, ten years ago?I’ve read “Beast in the Garden”, twice.What you are claiming isn’t in my copy.Do you have some page numbers?

jcfitz7

3/30/2009 10:35:53 PM

I just hope the dog was feed an organic diet.This is Boulder after all.

NurseRatchet

3/30/2009 10:37:21 PM

First, I was agreeing with someone else’s point-see the thread post.

But here’s the NPR broadcast with the author David Baron. Apparently took place in 1991 behind the school of an 18 year old.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1580004

I like all the talk about Boulder-people being really happy when a lion was in their back yard and how great everyone thought it was. It’s very Boulder and reflects KR’s attitude. The initial impulse is right, but in the end maybe not all that well thought out.

laughinghard

3/30/2009 11:10:02 PM

This is what happens, unfortunately, when you choose to live near wildlife.

Just like those that play with fire eventually get burned.

@vYRaL303 – I don’t understand why she didn’t give her name but her address was printed, either. Baffling. Out for blood… nice one…

InsipidPhenom

3/30/2009 11:12:56 PM

p.s. pay close attention to the bit about the woman being chased up a tree by two lions and it “changing our attitude” in Boulder about this issue. The broadcast claims that after this incident when a dog was killed we decided to kill the lion. We’ve obviously got a short memory in Boulder and are slowly moving back the other way and it will take someone being killed or mauled before we go the other extreme.

Does anyone know if lions are like alligators in that once they get a taste for blood of a dog they continue to hunt it for the rest of their life? They’ve got this problem in Florida-joggers sometimes snatched from running paths along miami causeways after they’ve developed a taste for blood. Once a alligator has eaten a dog from someone’s back yard, they have to hunt it down and kill it or it keeps hunting dogs, people, cats, all it’s life.

I guess alligators are like vampires that way-once they develop the taste for blood, it’s an insatiable taste 🙂

laughinghard

3/30/2009 11:16:28 PM

oh, and further, if you try to play your ‘IT KILLED A KID IN 1991’ card, go right ahead.it doesn’t make a lick of difference in the scheme of things.

do you want me to elaborate? i’m sure you wouldn’t care but i will.

drunk drivers.

they kill thousands of kids each year.

ergo, we must kill drunk drivers.or ban alcohol.

right?

no?

aw, why not? 🙁

point: one random mauling almost 20 years ago doesn’t equal a pandemic.and you can ask people who live in highlands and in deserts and in southern cali and near the everglades whether they miss their pets, and they all will say yes – but i can guarantee you that the federal government and even the overwhelming majority of people who have had their pets killed/have been injured will agree that those “dangerous” predators deserve to be protected in their natural habitat, for the simple fact that they were here before we were, we have no more right to live here than them if they do nothing wrong, but if they do get dangerous then we’ll control them.but mass extermination of endangered predators is about as absurd a prospect as any.

seriously.i can’t stop shaking my head.

dd_unlimited

3/31/2009 2:46:54 AM

Predators will kill and eat the easiest target…that’s natural.They’ve survived because they adapt to eat whatever they can find.Just like humans, they can get habituated to the easiest meal, not the best but the easiest.If you have pets/children be vigilant about their safety or if you choose to leave your pets/children out unattended, you must accept the possible consequences.

Teledude

3/31/2009 6:50:38 AM

laughinghard… maybe you should reread the book because you have no clue… the stories you just told didn’t happen here..

jjim

3/31/2009 7:18:52 AM

I lub dem fuzzy lions.

meatpieandtatters

3/31/2009 7:31:16 AM

Fluffy…NOOooooo.

sidd

3/31/2009 7:52:31 AM

People who really love their dogs do not give them doggy doors or let them into the yard before first checking to see what else might be in the yard.

If, as appears to be the case this time, the lion jumps the fence after the dog is already outside – that’s a tragedy and there is very little to be done except removing the lion, as was done here.

There has never been a kid eaten by a lion in Boulder county – it just didn’t happen no matter what fantasies are reported as fact by weird people on this blog.

connie@cozmic.com

3/31/2009 7:57:37 AM

laughinghard

The link you posted has the FEEBS VIRUS.

abovemypaygrade

3/31/2009 7:59:53 AM

Perhaps the eco system is out of whack…..mountain lions shouldn’t be living in populated areas and praying on easy kills such as dogs and cats.It’s like sharks attacking people in Florida or Australia where the waters have been overfished.Where as, if you were in South Africa, people are not being eaten and are not concerned because there is better balance of the eco system.Plenty of food and space = no attacks on non-typical prey.However, people live here, it is a populated area, and people are not moving , so I guess the DOW needs to get rid of some of the four legged predators….

MicMacGirl

3/31/2009 8:29:42 AM

Just last week someone in the Op page said we didn’t have this problem years ago because of all the dogs that ran around town.

I think the lion wanted to disprove this theory.

backrange

3/31/2009 8:30:01 AM

“The lion will be “hazed” to give it a negative association with humans…”

This hazing process included shaving off the lion’s eyebrows and using a magic marker to draw a moustache on its face.

gsegiet@flash.net

3/31/2009 8:53:35 AM

DD-angry little man much? First, I was continuing ona thread. And second, I only said the mountain lions didn’t have to thrive by eating dogs and the person here that was cheering the fact that a dog was killed was heartless. But heartless is better than your stupid rant any day.

Jjim-I guess NPR and the author of the book are wrong then.

laughinghard

3/31/2009 9:05:24 AM

If I remember correctly, “The Beast in the Garden” described a high school student in Idaho Springs, not in Boulder, that was killed by a lion…

scotts@ionsky.com

3/31/2009 9:36:06 AM

Let see here. There are 10 confirmed deaths of humans by way of mtn. lion in the past 100 years.

The kid that was killed in 1991 was jogging somewhere near his high school around Idaho Springs.

Living around them will in fact put you in their realm of existance, go figure….

skiin_on1

3/31/2009 9:50:26 AM

Posted by scotts on March 31, 2009 at 9:36 a.m. (Suggest removal)

If I remember correctly, “The Beast in the Garden” described a high school student in Idaho Springs, not in Boulder, that was killed by a lion…

******

Did you guys listen to the NPR broadcast which I linked to? The author describes it as Boulder and describes our mountain lion problem pretty well. I guess the NPR interviewer may not have read the book and the author may not have any idea over the content of his book. Which would be sad because he talks extensively about Boulder in this interview and it seems to be his premise for a lot of other things. Is his description of that woman being chased up a tree incorrect too? I honestly don’t know-just going off what the author said is in his book in this interview.

Some people here do not know how to read a thread are completely clueless about it in fact since my only original comment was only “yes” but now I’m being lambasted by idiot DD. So don’t get me wrong. I’m not anti-mountain lion. But I’m not going to cheer a dog dying either. Or make fun of “schnookums” and “fluffy” being ripped apart in pain. Or cheer generalizations about yippies with chihuahuas. Just because a dog isn’t a Golden doesn’t make his life worthless in my opinion though people in Boulder have some issue with small dogs. Dd’s post that we’re trying to supress the natural instinct…and his further rant are off. Yeah, of course we’ve got to manage a mountain lion population that wants to kill. Just like we’ve got to control people that want to kill people. We all have natural desires and instincts that have got to be managed. I would have preferred if half of Boulder had been generous enough to move to Longmont or Louisville and let the wildlife habitat have their mountains, but how likely is that to happen? This town talks a lot of talk, but Longmont and Louisville don’t fit in with the egos of some people and they’d rather invade mountain lion habitat than live in a town they constantly run down on this site in comments.

Here is the link again to the NPR broadcast:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1580004

laughinghard

3/31/2009 10:09:50 AM

These Comments: “This is what happens, unfortunately, when you choose to live near wildlife”. and “we live in the mountains. we chose to live here” make me laugh. I moved here from the mountains. This is not the mountains. In fact, this is downright urban, except that the west side of the city is up against the foothills. In real mountain towns we value our children and pets (like in the recent “Dog Guardian” article, except we’re called owners).

If a mountain lion starts coming into a populated area, we have it taken out of there. If it’s an old lion that has come to town because it can no longer hunt effectively, the only choice is to euthanize. The DOW handled this correctly and humanely. Relocation makes sense. None of this deluded “nice kitty” stuff with a 150lb predator.

Salinger

3/31/2009 10:10:11 AM

Jesus, just leave a big ball of yarn in your yard and the lions will ignore Fluffy.

degas_e

3/31/2009 10:14:18 AM

Laughing –

the “Beast in the Garden” article was also re-run in Reader’s Digest a while ago.I have not listened to NPR, but they must have got it wrong.

The woman was up above Chautaqua when she encountered the lion that “chased” her up a tree.She treed herself because she didn’t know if it would come after her if she walked down past it.This did not occur in the city per se.The article is mis-leading when it talks about the boy in Idaho Springs because it does not make it clear how far apart Boulder and Idaho Springs are.A non-careful reader (or someone unfamiliar with the local geography) might think they occured in the same place.Furthermore, he was training (he was a good long distance runner) on a loop that took him past the school and then high up above the canyon floor to where he was attacked.It did not occur in Boulder, or on the high school grounds in Idaho Springs either, but at least two miles away.

Finally, I’ve lived in Boulder for over 30 years and I can assure you that no one has been killed by a mtn lion within the city during that time.

goalline

3/31/2009 10:43:18 AM

It isn’t NPR espousing this information, though I hoped the interviewer would have read the book and corrected the author-the author of Beast in the Garden is on NPR saying it took place in Boulder. And I don’t think the chautaqua incident you speak of is the same one as in interview the author describes TWO mountain lions chasing a woman. Who is this author anyway? Did he get a ghost writer to write the book and has no clue what it contains?

Either way, I’m still not going to cheer a dog dying in pain.

Listen to the interview and comment please. Are all the incidents the author describes completely fictional?

laughinghard

3/31/2009 10:51:37 AM

It is the same event.There may have been two lions – but I’m sure it was above Chatauqua on one of the many hiking trails.It’s been a while since I read it.

The HS student was definately in Idaho Springs (actually outside it – nothing “jumped a fence” and no one saw it happen.The police initially wondered what kind of sicko they were dealing with when they found the body.It was so unusual, they didn’t think a lion did it until one kept watching them and wouldn’t go away while they were doing the forensics work).I was annoyed when I finished reading, because it was done very sensationalistically (is that word?) and not very accurately.

NPR needs to interview first hand witnesses.They always interview other reporters or promote authors… kind of silly.It’s not hard to find people in Idaho Springs who knew the boy.

goalline

3/31/2009 11:02:55 AM

I haven’t listened to the NPR link (don’t have time) so I can’t comment on that.Regarding the woman in the tree, I don’t think it was above Chautaqua.Again, if I remember the book correctly, she was running in Fourmile Canyon and went to cross over to Sunshine by cutting through the trees near Poorman Rd. when she was treed…

scotts@ionsky.com

3/31/2009 11:14:44 AM

Wow. The author describes it completely differently in several interviews if indeed we are talking about the same thing. I still have a hard time believing he got it so wrong since he claims to have done all this research with people in boulder at university tracking the events and encounters. He says a mountain lion stalked the kids outside the fence all day and then in complete day light, took down one of the kids as he was leaving the school and people were picking up their kids from school and traffic was stopped and there wasn’t anything anybody could do. He also says this woman ran in to the two lions and she made herself quite large like you’re supposed to and they chased her down and she had to scramble up a tree. He then makes all these constructs all these arguments from these incidents describing our liberal attitude and how happy we were when beasts came back into our town and that these events were a turning point in our attitude. WTF? How can an author be so off about his own writing? Are you sure these aren’t separate incidents?

laughinghard

3/31/2009 11:17:46 AM

I defer to Scotts regarding the woman.It’s been a while since I read this.I agree it was on the trails west of Boulder.

The bit about the HS student happened far away from the school and no one witnessed it.It was in daylight (near noon), which was part of why no one suspected a lion.Anything about traffic being stopped, etc. is pure fabrication.

goalline

3/31/2009 11:27:56 AM

An NPR story incorrect?No way!

I heard that due to the economic slow-down, NPR has changed the name of their popular show to “Some Things Considered.”Perhaps they’ve also cut back on their due diligence before broadcasting stories in general.

backrange

3/31/2009 11:36:36 AM

Goalline:I’m pretty sure I remember that part correctly, but I’ll check the book when I can (in a couple of days, I’m out of town right now).Also, your recollection of the high school student shounds right to me.I think there was speculation that while he was running he may have surprised the lion, which may have instigated the attack…

scotts@ionsky.com

3/31/2009 11:37:03 AM

Posted by backrange on March 31, 2009 at 11:36 a.m. (Suggest removal)

An NPR story incorrect? No way!

*****

It’s more than an NPR being wrong and apparently not reading the book, it’s the AUTHOR of the book describing events that either never took place, embellishing them immensely, or we’re still talking about separate incidents.

laughinghard

3/31/2009 11:41:08 AM

Laughing – Google “Scott Lancaster 1991 Clear Creek High School Idaho Springs”.There are conflicting reports in the web sites you’ll find, but the story I’m confident in is that he ran on a trail above the school and encountered the lion.No witnesses.It is the only event in 1991.

goalline

3/31/2009 11:47:43 AM

OMG laughinghard. STOP posting and read the book again for crying out loud! You’ve got it wrong– just admit it! Sheesh!

babalax50@yahoo.com

3/31/2009 11:55:14 AM

http://www.cougarinfo.org/attacks2.htm

goalline – that website lists all cougar/mountain lion attacks since 1991 (weirdly enough).it mentions the idaho springs (colorado) incident.

obviously what happened here is a case of an author who turned idaho springs into boulder, which pretty much means he either a. was very mistaken, which would also mean he didn’t actually do the research himself or b. he thought BOULDER, co would be more recognizable by a national audience than idaho springs, co and therefore thought the change would be irrelevant to anyone living outside the state.

either way, laughinghard is dead wrong.why won’t he/she/it stop being skeptical? because he/she/it is your typical DC poster who can’t handle being proven wrong and won’t admit as much.

trust me, bud: you are.

and as far as your passing off of what i said, look closely at your comments.according to you, it’ll take ‘another death’ for us to ‘move to the other extreme.obviously, having proven that you’re wrong about anyone dying in boulder because of a mountain lion attack in the last 20 years, the first part of your logic doesn’t fit.and your second part implies that we’re going to have to start exterminating them, for no valid reason.

when the very basis of your initial argument is wrong, everything else you say after it is at the same, wrong.

one dog being killed by a mountain lion in a (correction, since we apparently don’t live in the mountains, according to some mountain snob who posted above) HILL town is not cause to push the alarm button and there’s no need to get OMGdramaz over it.i’m sorry if i was harsh on you, laughinghard, i don’t intend for my comment to be muddled by a “rant,” but nonetheless, your comment(s) were still stupid, and please bugger off.

dd_unlimited

3/31/2009 1:40:08 PM

also laughinghard, FYI, i understand what you heard on NPR, but until you read a book, don’t try to comment on its contents. you just wind up looking very, very silly.

dd_unlimited

3/31/2009 1:41:10 PM

*****And before you start the mass comments of disbelief, the story was well documented and can be read in Beast In the Garden.*****

^^^LOL!

“We’ve obviously got a short memory in Boulder and are slowly moving back the other way and it will take someone being killed or mauled before we go the other extreme.”

^^^ speaking of short memories, how long have you lived in Boulder, laughinghard?

obviously not long enough to even have a long memory, since it never happened.

again. lol.

dd_unlimited

3/31/2009 1:44:55 PM

This would have turned out much differently if the dog was armed.

orbison

3/31/2009 2:12:59 PM

What kills me about the they-were-here-firsters is that if you talk to old-timers, people who’ve lived in Boulder before 1970, they will tell you that mountain lions were never a problem back then. Rangers and citizens shot at them and they didn’t come back into town. It’s only since Boulder and its wildlife decision-makers adopted the “ooh, ahh” stance toward cougars (documented in the book Beast in the Garden) that pets have been getting eaten and citizens mauled.Roaches and viruses were here first too, and we don’t welcome them because they aren’t MAGNIFICENT creatures in quite the same way cougars are. We need the move the needle in Boulder toward getting the deer out of town and toward more aggressive deterrence of cougars in general.

chicago

3/31/2009 6:32:44 PM

May I suggest that telling another person with which one disagrees to “bugger off” is both ill mannered and may cause you to be confused with one of the members of that population commonly known as the ‘academented”.Surely that is something no one wants.

Fact 1.

For most om America’s history, mountain lion attacks were virtually u heard of.

Fact 2.

Only after man was forbidden from exercising his Constitutional Guarantee to defend his life andproperty by enviro-socialist regulations and laws, were lion attacks to multiply by an order of magnitude.

For the socialism impaired, that means mountain lion attacks became ten times more frequent.

Fact 3.

Only an armed citizenry can prevent predatory attacks.This is true for two legged predators as it is for four legged predators.

Fact 4.

Get together with the rest of those who don’t have secret dreams of being mountain lion scat and have the Open Space Park regs changed to allow OPEN CARRY!

Remember what the 100 year history of mountain lion attacks shows clearly and unambiguously – When Gunpowder Speaks, Beasts Obey!

It is only a matter of time before the Open Space Park regulation infringing the Colorado citizen’s right to open carry causes more pets to be killed, or (worse yet) a human to be mauled, killed, even eaten by a cat.

PSOpen Carry does also tend to lower the number of rapes, robberies, even murders which occur in parks.

Fact 5.

Get your concealed weapon permit.Your life IS worth the trouble and cost.

Fact 6.

Jennifer Churchill and the rest of the Colorado wildlife officers can’t protect you from predators.That IS your responsibility.

Fact 7.

Attemnpts to analogize traffic fatalities with being dragged down, slowly killed, and eaten, by a cat borders on sociopathy.

We choose to drive, and can exercise our skills to arrive alive.

The socialism impaired used large bodied predators to justify socializing vast areas of America and they didn’t give a damn about their having deliberately taken away their victim’s Constitutional Guarantee to defend against such predators in the only way a human can so do; with a firearm.

To listen to one such ‘crat (cat bureaucrat), go to www.EvergladesInstitute.org and look up the video of the Panther Project ‘leader’.

Lil’ Debbie looked right into the camera and told the owner of a campground where the agencies cat killed dozens of cats, 14 goats, and some emu and other birds – “Panthers are an asset to this campground”.

Yes, she does have a degree, she did say that, it was a demented statement, hence “academented”.

No, I didn’t pay her to say that – she did it on her own.

Final Chilling Fact.

Dr. Paul Beier, a lead cat biologist, told the NY Times that “every now and again, they are going to eat one of us.I’m comfortable with that.”

PSNo such cats stalk the corridors of the university where he holds forth with such statements.

GladesGuru

3/31/2009 6:33:56 PM

DD-May I suggest that you not post anymore until you LEARN TO READ A THREAD. My original comment was YES. You’re a complete idiot and I’ll be glad when you graduate and leave. This town doesn’t want you.

laughinghard

3/31/2009 7:20:22 PM

Posted by babalax50 on March 31, 2009 at 11:55 a.m. (Suggest removal)

OMG laughinghard. STOP posting and read the book again for crying out loud! You’ve got it wrong– just admit it! Sheesh!

*****

I’m totally amazed that people are lambasting me because they CAN NOT READ A THREAD. My original comment was YES. That’s it. Why don’t you go back and read and listen to the NPR INTERVIEW WITH THE AUTHOR who apparently researched the events WITH RESEARCHERS FROM CU BOULDER whereas you’ve done nothing but scan a few comments, come to the wrong conclusions, and then thrash other people with your stupid banality. I’ve only heard the NPR broadcast. REREAD THE original post from the person that read the book THAT I WAS RESPONDING TO and from now on don’t post on a message board if you don’t know how to read them. Now I’d appreciate it if you’d shut up and stop telling the rest of the world what to do.

laughinghard

3/31/2009 7:25:30 PM

Laughinghard, just to ease your anxiety regarding the terrible pain that you believe that fluffy suffered when eaten by simba. Most animals, us included go into a type of shock response when we/they are in a desperate situation. This shock response mercifully shuts down the vast majority of pain receptors, so although we would all like it much better if fluffy where cuddled up with her/his guardian on the bed tonight, he/she/it most likely was in little dogie heaven before he/she/it ever had any realization of excruciating pain.I once suffered the indignity of having my leg severed in a bike/car altercation. I never felt a thing until I regained my composure while laying in the road.Thankfully modern science prevailed, and my two leg halves where successfully reunited. The healing was far more painful then the occurrence.Don’t lose any sleep over fluff’s suffering. Fluffy is now just one more bit of dust in the universe; and whatever you do for heaven sakes, do not depend on NPR for factual information without first vetting anything they feed you.

biker_joe

3/31/2009 9:27:25 PM

so. laughinghard’s solution is to kill the lions to save the dogs. and he/she/it uses overdevelopment and the random death of a kid 18 years ago as justification for this pointless logic.

guess what, laughinghard.we live in the mountains.we chose to live here.wildlife was here before we were.WE brought dogs HERE.where the hell is your logic leading to? and then you try using alligators in the same metaphor?! alligators are basically living dinosaurs that have managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years doing what it does best – hunt and kill.to tell people to stop accepting that as a natural trait of wild predators is STUPID and counters everything we know about nature itself.

you’re basically saying that lions are unacceptable, because your fluffy shnookums doesn’t get mauled.you’re basically saying that survival of the fittest doesn’t apply; that every law of hunter-hunted nature is moot now that yippies want to keep their property values up and save their chihuahuas.

yours, sir/madam/thing, is the most stupid insipid comment i’ve ever read.

dd_unlimited

3/31/2009 2:38:42 AM

“leave the mountain lions alone. if you don’t want to live near wildlife, move to New York City.”

Hey! Leave the little white fluffy dogs alone.If you don’t want to live near domestic life, move to Boulder…

tpon

4/1/2009 11:26:01 AM

I wish a mountain lion would eat some of the posters here.Before he eats them I wish he would give them a couple of minutes to make one final post with their views on the matters being discussed here.

rungreger

4/1/2009 8:25:40 PM

Boulderites cannot be allowed to protect themselves and their loved ones (furry friends included), because their rights to do so have been curtailed by the government. Had the human friends of this dog killed the mountain lion with a Gun, this would be a Headline Camera story about lunatic with a Gun.

The CO DoW can shoot with a tranquilizer Gun long after the tragedy. The Camera did not report that the DoW used a Gun. Isn’t that odd?

HairTrigger

4/3/2009 7:44:11 PM

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