Evania Fotopoulos, a sophomore at the University of Colorado, races to pull recyclable containers from a Dumpster during the Recycling X-Games outside of the University Memorial Center on Tuesday. The event also tested students' recycling abilities in other contests like the phone book shot put and commingled container skee ball.
Zak Wood
Evania Fotopoulos, a sophomore at the University of Colorado, races to pull recyclable containers from a Dumpster during the Recycling X-Games outside of the University Memorial Center on Tuesday. The event also tested students’ recycling abilities in other contests like the phone book shot put and commingled container skee ball.

BOULDER, Colo. –

Some University of Colorado students have been practicing their recycling all year, and on Tuesday they could finally measure their mettle against their peers in CU’s recycling X-Games. The event was held at the University Memorial Center fountain and tested students’ recycling abilities in contests like the phone book shot put, commingled container skee ball, and a recycling Dumpster dive.

“The goal is ultimately to increase participation in recycling,” said Dan Baril, CU’s recycling program manager. “We want people to recognize that recycling isn’t a hard option, it’s easy to do, it’s fun â â and it’s silly, you know, in this respect.

Prizes for the most skilled recyclers included tickets to the Fox Theatre, gift certificates to Hapa Sushi, Half-Fast Subs and Pasta Jay’s, and a Green Guru recycled messenger bag as the grand prize.

The competition is taking place during week nine of Recycle Mania â a 10-week contest among more than 500 colleges across the country to see which school can recycle the most. The competition is divided into several categories, such as recycling diversion rate, total pounds recycled and least trash per person.

Some students have been preparing for the recycling X-Games for months and even years â though perhaps inadvertently.

“I do have my own recycling bin outside my house,” said sophomore Evania Fotopoulos, who just finished the commingled container skee ball, “so I can practice my aim in the off-season.”

Recycling X Games

Archived comments

I believe CU recently sent out a memo explaining the campus recycling program is being run at a net loss.

So if people have to engage in productive labor to pay taxes to support a losing recycling program, I wonder if this represents a net increase or decrease in carbon footprint.

annoying@annoying.com

3/17/2009 5:08:35 PM

A recycled six-pack of aluminum cans could save enough energy to drive a car five miles, or, it means one recycled aluminum can is equivalent in energy to a half a can full of gasoline. (bringrecycling.org)

I seriously doubt working a little more to pay a little more for recycling results in more energy used than is saved.

bobmobber@hotmail.com

3/17/2009 6:03:08 PM

bobmobber – A recycled six-pack of aluminum cans could save enough energy to drive a car five miles

30 cans per pound, about $0.60 per pound of AL.

So about 90 cans should be worth a gallon of gas. Assuming 30 mpg, this is 3 cans per mile.

Assuming, of course, can collecting labor and transport is free.

——–

Wonder what the numbers look like for cardboard and plastic.

annoying@annoying.com

3/17/2009 6:27:55 PM

In most 3rd world countries (where America will be shortly) there are active markets in scrap Al. Can’t say I’ve ever seen much activity in plastic scrap or cardboard scrap.

Wonder which one is the biggest tax dollar loser for CU?

annoying@annoying.com

3/17/2009 6:31:02 PM

TO:Boulder Campus Teaching & Research Faculty, Staff,

Deans, Directors, Dept Chairs, System Administration

FROM:Environmental Center

SENDER:Daniel Baril

DATE:February 25, 2009

SUBJECT: CU Clarifies Recycling Steps, Prepares for Next Level of Development

Along with the world around us, the Recycling Industry is changing.

……

Office papers and newspaper generate revenue for CU that would be lost if it was mixed in with everything else.These revenues help

lower student ***fees**** for recycling and can be reinvested to expand recycling

campus-wide.

………

recycling are one of the few bright spots in the economy.Although

recycling revenues have also dropped with the economic downturn and, for

now, ***a subsidy is required to keep the program whole*** it’s still the right thing to do

…..

annoying@annoying.com

3/17/2009 6:42:42 PM

“30 cans per pound, about $0.60 per pound of AL.

So about 90 cans should be worth a gallon of gas. Assuming 30 mpg, this is 3 cans per mile.

Assuming, of course, can collecting labor and transport is free.”

That’s not what my citation was saying.First, recycling is NOT all about money.Second, the energy SAVED in recycling vs. new production is equal to the energy that would drive a car 5 miles.NOT the cost of gas that could be purchased with the market value of an empty can.

bobmobber@hotmail.com

3/17/2009 7:45:10 PM