BOULDER, Colo. –

While Thursday’s heavy snowfall may have caused its share of chaos, the precipitation proved promising enough for the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office to lift fire restrictions posted earlier this month.

“Because of the amount of snow we’ve gotten, the risk of fire conditions have been reduced considerably for the time being,” sheriff’s Cmdr. Rick Brough said.

Though unseasonably warm and dry weather prompted the sheriff’s office to post restrictions on open burning and fireworks on March 10, Thursday’s snowfall should restore enough moisture in the topsoil and vegetation to keep conditions favorable for the unforeseeable future, Brough said.

Until Thursday’s storm, Boulder County has been facing one of the driest late-winter seasons in recent Colorado history.

The precipitous powder also is favorable for the general condition of Colorado’s snowpack, reservoir storage, and ground water profile, said Brian Werner, spokesman for the Northern Colorado Water Conservation District.

“This was badly needed,” Werner said. “Plus, it looks wet â and we need the wet ones in the spring time.”

Werner said that, until Thursday, moisture levels in the topsoil and the water levels of ponds and streams were teetering on less than average â a cause for concern when it comes to tapping reservoir resources and agricultural irrigation.

“This snow storm is going to be so positive for us,” Werner said. “Spring storms are just important in general â and this couldn’t have come at a better time.”

Archived comments

There’s a big plume of black smoke up near Long’s Peak.What burns when covered in feet of snow?

bobmobber@hotmail.com

3/27/2009 9:01:27 AM

bobmobber-

Propane tanks?

InigoMontoya

3/27/2009 9:30:48 AM