STUDY: TECHNOLOGY’S OVERWHELMING

They are comfortable with gadgets, yet shudder sometimes as the cell phone rings.

This group — primarily male and in their late 20s — is called the “Ambivalent Networkers” in a study released by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. Pew found this group notable because its members have lived with the Internet and other technologies for much of their lives.

In the study, Pew examined American adults’ gadgets and services, their activities and their attitudes toward technology. About 60 percent of the overall respondents didn’t have significant attachments to mobile devices, either because they didn’t have such gadgets or because they were fine with desktop PCs.

But nearly 40 percent did say they were glued to their mobile devices. And the Ambivalent Networkers make up a fifth of that group.

“They’re the most active on social networks and using mobile devices for a range of activities, yet they think it’s a good idea to take a break,” said John Horrigan, Pew’s associate director for research. “They are not thrilled about all that’s available.”

T-MOBILE DEBUTS USB ‘DONGLE’

T-Mobile USA is opening up its new cellular broadband network to laptops for the first time, with the recent launch of a USB “dongle” that lets portable computers get wireless Internet access.

The plug-in device costs $50 with a two-year contract, or $100 if the buyer is signing up for one year. From then, service costs $60 per month for up to 5 gigabytes of traffic.

— Associated Press