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Alea Richmond, Peace Corps coordinator for the University of Colorado, talks to CU junior Cecilia Achuka, right, during the Spring Student Involvement and Volunteer Fair in the University Memorial Center on Wednesday.
PAUL AIKEN
Alea Richmond, Peace Corps coordinator for the University of Colorado, talks to CU junior Cecilia Achuka, right, during the Spring Student Involvement and Volunteer Fair in the University Memorial Center on Wednesday.

University of Colorado’s Glenn Miller Ballroom bustled Wednesday as students met with numerous clubs and volunteer organizations at the Spring Student Involvement and Volunteer Fair.

Nearly 100 student groups and 40 volunteer organizations offered students information and answered questions, while Boulder afrobeat band Paa Kow’s By All Means Band provided entertainment. For a few groups though, it was their first chance to introduce themselves to the public.

Freshmen Robert Policht and Tom Standring formed the Off Road Club at CU in late August and missed the fall version of the fair. At only 12 members, the club is still growing but remains active.

“We get out a lot, almost every weekend,” Policht said about how often the club hits the trails. “Although, the (NFL) playoffs are now, so not as much lately.”

On Wednesday, Policht and Standring saw a steady trickle of interested students and used some of their time reassuring people that they didn’t need a 4-by-4.

Brandon Morgan, a freshman, browsed through the tables at the event. Morgan, who ended his active duty in the U.S. Army on Sunday, said the fair was a great place to make friends, although, he added that the transition from the Army to college life was “a bit of a culture shock.”

The CU Triathlon Club was another student group making its first appearance at the fair and used the afternoon to promote the Feb. 20 Frozen Foot 5K race on the CU campus.

Sophomore Tess Amer, who greeted people at the booth, said that generating a buzz about the club was more difficult, because many student tri-athletes seek a strong program before heading to college.

The spring fair complements a version of the event in the fall, which is held behind the University Memorial Center. The location of the fall event provides a better spot to attract curious students, and on Wednesday a few booths noticed a drop in attendance.

Kris Pohl, the volunteer coordinator for Butterfly Pavilion in Broomfield, said that the location behind the UMC provided a better opportunity for students to see the Pavilion’s animals, which included a tarantula named Rosie and a couple of hissing cockroaches.

Laura Niss, who was behind the Tango Club’s table located next to the main entrance, agreed that the Wednesday’s event was less populated.

“I don’t think there’s a lot of people here,” Niss said. “Last semester we had about 100 students.” (Her estimate, then, for the Tango Club’s table was 15.)

For some of the organizations, the type of club they were promoting made their jobs easier. Molly McShea who was behind the Travel Club table had an easy explanation for all the students’ interest.

“People just like to travel,” she said.

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