Jantsen

If you go

Who: Jantsen, Devin Martin, Rainbow Wheel of Death, Coult 45 and The Digital Connection

When: 9 p.m. Saturday

Where: Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St.

Cost: $18

www. bouldertheater.com

It’s a busy music weekend in Boulder and Denver.

Jantsen and Devin Martin headline Saturday’s Boulder Theater electro dance party. Plus, indie popster Jeremy Messersmith hits the Walnut Room tonight.

Boulder Theater Dubstep Party

What happens when you bring together a collection of dubstep electro artists?

You create the ultimate dance experience.

Saturday, the Boulder Theater brings together Jantsen, Devin Martin, Rainbow Wheel of Death, Coult 45 and The Digital Connection for a night of dub-inspired music.

Rainbow Wheel of Death actually features Michal Menert and Mikey Thunder from Pretty Lights Music.

Plus, this show marks Martin’s Colorado debut. The young, up-and-coming producer’s from Orlando, Fla., and he’s stirring things up around the country.

“Orlando has a rich, cultured music scene,” Martin said. “I started producing on the computer as a hobby and it grew into a passion.

“I’m only 20, but I take this seriously. I got lucky and so far things are working out pretty well. I’m looking to travel more.”

Martin’s building a serious reputation for his debstep electro house music.

“I go back and forth between current dubstep and slightly older house music,” Martin said. “I had a passion for both styles, so I put them together.

“It’s a more uptempo style and more dance-oriented.”

Martin is psyched to bring his brand of dubstep to the Boulder Theater and join forces with the other artists.

“This show will touch on the genres and sub-genres of dubstep,” Martin said. “You won’t hear the same thing twice. It’s like going to a buffet and getting a little bit of everything you want.

“It will be a very high tempo, high energy show and I’m really excited about that.”

Jeremy Messersmith

Jeremy Messersmith’s creating a buzz in the indie rock world.

The Minnesota musician’s gaining fans with his storytelling songs and his weekly website updates. That’s where fans participate in everything from Twitter scavenger hunts to live studio sessions.

Tonight, Messersmith and his band will rock Denver’s Walnut Room.

“I grew up playing instruments in school and in churches,” Messersmith said. “This was the one thing I was good at and it’s a lot of fun.”

Messersmith’s music is fun and poppy, but stories form the heart of his songs.

“As a frustrated novelist and filmmaker, I like to tell a story,” Messersmith said. “As for the music, it is 60’s influences nerd rock.

“Usually, I start out writing about something that happened to me –and then I have to spice it up. The trick is in balancing it. I have to connect to the song emotionally — I want every song to be personal, so people can identify with it.”

Messersmith’s song topics set this performer apart from the storytelling pack. This guy wrote a “Star Wars'” tune and created an entire album devoted to death songs.

Messersmith also created a trilogy of records dubbed The Alcatraz Kid, The Silver City and The Reluctant Graveyard. Yes, that’s the death album.

“I wanted to make a record about death and dying,” Messersmith said. “Hopefully, it’s not super-depressing. It was a nice way to end the thematic trilogy.”

Messersmith has also been busy with his weekly Wednesday website surprises. Fans can find it at jeremymessersmith.com.

“I started it to stay engaged with people and try something new,” Messersmith said. “It’s an easy way to get people to return to the website and for people to get to know my music.

“We’ve had a Twitter-based scavenger hunt — that was fun. I just did an afternoon concert from my house. We took requests on Twitter and I brought the band in the afternoon to play the show. It’s a great way to connect with people.”

Now Messersmith’s ready to bring his music to Denver.

“I’m bringing the band this time,” Messersmith said. “Now that I’m getting my songs on TV shows I can afford to do this.

“This is the first time I have a four-piece band and we can all sing four-part harmony The show’s going to go from hard rock band music to mellow coffee shop music.”

Messersmith’s already planning the next phase of his career.

“It’s been a year since the last record and I’m working on some new stuff,” Messersmith said. “I always try to do something I haven’t done before.”

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