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SNAKE THAT’S A FAKE

Exotic animal prints are so ubiquitous this fall that it wouldn’t be surprising if Post-it started making cheetah-print sticky notes or Starbucks began to offer limited-edition cup sleeves done in a fierce leopard.

On the creepier side of exotic, there’s snake print. Colorful ’60s-style snake-skin boots appeared on the Prada fall-winter 2011 runway, and since then the print has been showing up on all sorts of things. We found some ways to dabble in the trend without harming a single reptile.

Current Elliott’s boa-print cropped skinny jeans done in paprika-colored denim ($198 at Neimanmarcus.com) are particularly fetching.

For a casual pop of reptile print, a T-shirt from Sass & Bide ($190 at Net-a-porter.com) is an easy way to spice up the usual jeans and tee combo. For something sportier, Keds has done its classic canvas oxfords in a graphic black-and-white snake motif ($40 at Keds.com).

Snake print can go dressy quite easily, adding an edgy elegance to just about anything. The platform, peep-toe “Bodacious” shoe from Charles David ($250 at Charles David Los Angeles) is done in alternating snake-printed and black leather, with a T-strap that gives it a sleek ’70s disco feel.

Don’t forget your gadgets. They need cute accessories too. A snake-print leather iPad case from Michael Michael Kors ($130 at Net-a-porter.com) makes a statement while protecting techie toys.

For a particularly strange twist, there’s Rodial’s Glamoxy Snake Mask ($83 at Beautybar.com). The beauty treatment doesn’t technically have any snake in it, but it does contain a neuropeptide called syn-ake that is said to have an effect similar to the bite of a temple viper. In this case, that means a slight freezing of the face and a potential alternative to Botox.

The mask goes on in a thick black goop, and then peels off once it’s dried — sort of like a snake shedding its skin.

–Melissa Magsaysay, Los Angeles Times