Skip to content

Breaking News

  • Nixon

    Nixon

  • Brad Wolf dressed as Eren's Titan form during Denver Comic...

    Craig F. Walker / The Denver Post

    Brad Wolf dressed as Eren's Titan form during Denver Comic Con at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver on Saturday.

  • Rachel Speights dressed as Harley Quinn for Denver Comic Con...

    Craig F. Walker / The Denver Post

    Rachel Speights dressed as Harley Quinn for Denver Comic Con at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver on Saturday.

  • Gary Erwin dressed as the The Red Skull during Denver...

    Craig F. Walker / The Denver Post

    Gary Erwin dressed as the The Red Skull during Denver Comic Con at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver on Saturday.

  • Heather Borer dressed as Comic Book Girl during Denver Comic...

    Craig F. Walker / The Denver Post

    Heather Borer dressed as Comic Book Girl during Denver Comic Con at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver on Saturday.

of

Expand

Nerds descended on Colorado last weekend, arriving in droves and dressed to the nines as characters from each and every far-off corner of the pop-culture universe for the Denver Comic Con. Drawing more than 100,000 attendees and only in its fourth year, DCC has exploded onto the nationwide comic convention scene. It’s a three-day event, and I found myself ambling downtown Saturday to catch sight of the spectacle, and that spectacle alone is worth the price of admission.

Truth be told, I was a little reticent about attending this year. I’ve been to various similar events in the past and enjoyed myself, but conventions don’t really jump out at me as a mandatory annual event like they do for other fans. I don’t have much interest in collecting original artwork or other souvenirs, and I’m not often starstruck enough to seek out autographs or the like, so I was a little hesitant prior to entering the front doors.

That feeling almost immediately dissipated after walking 15 feet and seeing an older couple cosplaying as Tom Servo and Crow from “Mystery Science Theatre 3000.”

Soon after they faded from sight and I dredged my brain back to the present from thinking about how awesome that show was, other cosplayers started to filter into view, and I lightened up a bit and started enjoying myself. I saw some interesting takes on the TARDIS from “Doctor Who,” several thousand Harley Quinns, and one Freakazoid that was really well done but came with some Spandex that left absolutely nothing to the imagination (might want to try a jock strap or something next year).

There were countless panels and talks to attend, artists to seek out and bits of memorabilia to geek out on, but the standout moments of Comic Con for me were watching so many exuberant people running around and sharing their interests with each other.

I consider myself a pretty big nerd/geek/whatever, and it’s something I’ve had to learn to temper in most settings — when talking with friends as a kid, it took me longer than I’d like to admit to notice everyone else wanted to progress the conversation to topics beyond “Big Trouble in Little China.” (I caught on eventually). These conventions present a space to break away from that routine of nerdly restraint and let people be unabashedly excited about something they care about. It’s a pretty cool thing to witness and be a part of.

I did get to see one talk from Patrick Warburton, the voice of Brock Samson from “The Venture Bros.” (or more popularly, Puddy from “Seinfeld”), and puttered around some comic writers I enjoy, but those outings felt secondary to the fans and fellow attendees; they’re really what make any convention, comic-focused or otherwise, worth seeking out.

Sam Nixon’s “Words From a Nerd” runs every Wednesday in the Colorado Daily.

Join the Conversation

We invite you to use our commenting platform to engage in insightful conversations about issues in our community. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable to us, and to disclose any information necessary to satisfy the law, regulation, or government request. We might permanently block any user who abuses these conditions.