GET BREAKING NEWS IN YOUR BROWSER. CLICK HERE TO TURN ON NOTIFICATIONS.

X

  • Paula Coffman, a history teacher at Broomfield Heights Middle School, speak to the group before the annual Broomfield Women’s March, commemorating the ratification of the 19th amendment, and also honoring Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

  • Bette Erickson, with the flag, and Hans Fieldler lead about 200 people on a march around the Broomfield Civic area. Broomfield held its annual Women’s March on Jan. 18, 2020. It’s also the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment which allows women to vote.

  • Parker Dolson, left, puts his arm around his brother, Judah Moeggenberg, 8, to keep his warm. Broomfield held its annual Women’s March on Jan. 18, 2020. It’s also the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment which allows women to vote.

  • Leslie Norcross and her daughter, Gemma, listen to speakers before the march. Broomfield held its annual Women’s March on Jan. 18, 2020. It’s also the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment which allows women to vote.

  • BROOMFIELD, CO – JANUARY 18, 2020: Judah Moeggenberg, left, and her brother, endure the cold and wind to show off there signs. Broomfield held its annual Women’s March on January 18, 2020. It’s also the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment which allows women to vote. (Cliff Grassmick/Staff Photographer)

  • Protesters march around downtown Broomfield. Broomfield held its annual Women’s March on Jan. 18, 2020. It’s also the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment which allows women to vote.

of

Expand
PUBLISHED: | UPDATED:

Editor’s note: Wendy Fiedler’s name was misspelled in the original posting of this story.

Broomfield Heights Middle School teacher Paula Coffman came to this year’s Broomfield’s Women March dressed as Mrs. Banks, the suffragette featured in the movie “Mary Poppins.”

“What a beautiful event,” Coffman said. “As I look around, there’s a lot of people here that making a difference — every single one of you, because you showed up today.”

This year’s march began with comments at the Broomfield Amphitheater and celebrated the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.

Keynote speaker City and County Manager Jennifer Hoffman, who was labeled Broomfield’s first female leader by Wendy Fiedler during an introduction, said the moniker is really a misnomer.

“Broomfield is full of strong, powerful, thoughtful, bold women that have certainly paved the way for those of us that now get to be in their sunshine that they’ve created,” she said.

She may have the title, Hoffman said, but as she looked through the audience she saw many women she’s known over the past 18 years working at the city and county who paved the way for her to manage Broomfield.

Judah Moeggenberg, left, and her brother, ...
Judah Moeggenberg, left, and her brother, endure the cold and wind to show off there signs on Saturday, as Broomfield held its annual Women’s March . The event also marked the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment which allows women to vote.(Cliff Grassmick/Staff Photographer)

To celebrate the historical day with everyone is powerful, she said, especially since she was raised in a predominately matriarchal family of “strong, independent, hustling women,” some of whom joined her at the march, including her mother-in-law, daughter and niece. Her son, Henry, also attended.

Universally, women may not have equal pay, but in the City and County of Broomfield, those in hiring positions give the best positions to the best person, regardless of gender, Hoffman said. Many conversations are had about pay, some of which include the psychological pressures that are put on women in general not to negotiate for higher wages.

“From a female perspective, and a male perspective, we have to be good to each other,” she said. “We have to find a way, particularly supporting women supporting women. Nothing hurts my heart more than when that is not what it looks like or how it plays out.”

She pointed out, as a “fun fact,” that more women voted than men in Broomfield’s past election. Everyone knows how critical it is to vote, she said, and no matter who or what those votes are cast for, people shouldn’t complain when they don’t participate in the democratic process.

Fiedler and Annie Lessem organized the joint march, which also recognized Martrin Luther King Jr. Day. It was the fourth annual Broomfield Women’s March, and the second year to include an MLK Jr. component.

Lastly, Hoffman asked the roughly 100 people in attendance to be civil in this world of incivility.

Jen Thomas, of Arvada, came to the march with her two daughters and her mother Barb Dando. Each pushed a stroller carrying Ashlyn, 30 months, and Eva, 3 months. At the first Women’s March, which Dando spent in Washington, D.C. and Thomas spent in Denver, Thomas wore a t-shirt with an ultrasound photo of her first child with the inscription “the future is female.”

Dando said her mother has taken her to marches for years supporting various causes and institutions, including Planned Parenthood.

“My mom’s always set the example for me to stand up for change,” Thomas said.

It was the first time the family attended the Women’s March in Broomfield, which they chose because it was easier to manage parking and strollers. Healthcare, including a woman’s right to choose, equal rights and equal pay, protecting the environment and standing up for LBGTQ+ rights were among the issues the women championed. Pink lettering on their sign advertised the fact they were “three generations marching for, fighting for, and voting for change.”

Environmental issues are a major concern, Dando said, because “our president is sabotaging them on a global scale.”

Fiedler, one of the organizers of the event, greeted everyone at the beginning of the march. She reminded people that this was a family-friendly event and to refrain from vulgar language. She also asked people to try to be positive in their comments, chants and songs. Volunteers handed out song sheets with tunes such as “America the Beautiful,” “Let There be Peace on Earth” and “All You Need is Love” as suggestions.

“We live in a democracy and all have different opinions,” Fiedler, who has called the event nonpartisan, “and we all have a right to that.”

Along with signs advocating for general peace, equality and celebrating girls and women, there were a number of more politically-motivated signs advocating for keeping abortion legal, for “dumping Trump” and at least one woman wore an army green shirt proclaiming she does care, presumably in response to First Lady Melania Trump’s “I Really Don’t Care, Do You?” jacket.

Broomfield resident Yolanda Del Toro, and her shih tzu Chewie, walked around the pond, toward 120th Avenue and then down Main Street back toward the Mamie Doud Eisenhower Public Library.

She was glad to see people out marching this year because she believes there are still serious issues to be discussed. As a mother, she worries about her daughters’ futures, pay inequality and accessible healthcare.

Del Toro’s frustrated at the ongoing impeachment process because senators have a host of other issues they need to work on for the American people and instead they’re holding an impeachment trial, she believes.

Although she left her sign, “You’re Fired Mr. Trump,” in her car, she was glad to join this “amazing” march.

“There are real issues to discuss that we’re not discussing,” Del Toro said, as a chant of “This is what democracy looks like” made its way through the crowd.

Paula Coffman, a history teacher at ...
Paula Coffman, a history teacher at Broomfield Heights Middle School, speaks to the crowd before the annual Broomfield Women’s March on Saturday, commemorating the ratification of the 19th Amendment, and also honoring Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

blog comments powered by Disqus