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State-licensed medical marijuana dispensaries would be allowed to deliver cannabis products to Longmont medical marijuana patients’ homes, under an ordinance that got initial City Council approval in a unanimous Tuesday night vote.

Before giving preliminary approval to the ordinance, which now will be scheduled for a public hearing and final council vote on Oct. 13, council members agreed to remove a restriction that would have only allowed city-licensed medical marijuana businesses to make such deliveries to medical marijuana patients living inside Longmont’s city limits — as long as the city-licensed dispensary also holds a state-issued delivery permit and adheres to the state regulations about such deliveries.

Mayor Brian Bagley argued for amending that proposed version of the ordinance to allow medical marijuana retailers located in unincorporated enclaves surrounded by Longmont to get city and state permission to make such deliveries to Longmont customers.

That would benefit Native Roots, and representatives of the Native Roots chain of cannabis dispensaries also urged Longmont to allow deliveries.

Native Roots has a dispensary at 19 S. Sunset St. that’s in unincorporated Boulder County and is outside Longmont’s city limits. The company has encouraged the city to allow such outside-the-city dispensaries to deliver their products to the homes of Longmont customers.

After further council discussion, Bagley went a step further, suggesting an ordinance amendment that he said would allow all local government-licensed and state-licensed medical dispensaries — no matter where they’re located — to deliver medical marijuana products to Longmont customers.

That would man that everyone could deliver, Councilwoman Polly Christensen said.

Bagley also moved to remove a staff-proposed ordinance provision that would have required delivery drivers to be equipped with body cameras and use them to record all transactions with customers.

Councilwoman Joan Peck noted the state does not require body cameras. She said such a Longmont requirement might deter would-be delivery contractors from making those deliveries on behalf of licensed medical marijuana businesses to those business’ Longmont customers.

Council members voted unanimously to approve those change before proceeding to vote their preliminary approval of the revised ordinance.

In addition, licensees would be required to limit deliveries to the 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. hours of operation the city allows storefront marijuana businesses to be open.

The ordinance would not permit deliveries of recreational cannabis products from retailers.

Longmont has four city-licensed marijuana dispensaries within its city limits: The Green Solution, 206 S. Main St.; Medicine Man Longmont, 500 E. Rogers Road; Terrapin Care Station, 650 20th Ave., and Twin Peaks Dispensary, 900 S. Hover St., Unit A.

All four have city licenses for on-premises retail sales of recreational cannabis products, but only one, Twin Peaks Dispensary, is also licensed for medical marijuana products sales, according to the Longmont City Clerk’s Office. If the home-deliveries ordinance gets final council approval next month, the other three would have to get state and city licenses to operate as retail medical marijuana businesses, along with their retail recreational sales.

While Tuesday’s consideration of the ordinance did not include a public hearing, several people called the council earlier in the meeting to express their support for allowing home deliveries.

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