Smoke and flames are visible from Nelson Road and 39th Street as the CalWood Fire continues to burn in the foothills west of Longmont on Monday. As of Tuesday morning, the fire has burned 9,365 acres and damaged or destroyed 25 structures. (Matthew Jonas/Staff Photographer)
Smoke and flames are visible from Nelson Road and 39th Street as the CalWood Fire continues to burn in the foothills west of Longmont on Monday. As of Tuesday morning, the fire has burned 9,365 acres and damaged or destroyed 25 structures. (Matthew Jonas/Staff Photographer)
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While firefighting crews increased containment of the CalWood Fire Monday, Tuesday’s strong west winds fueled the south side of the fire.

The fire grew to 9,862 acres by late Tuesday, officials said at a community meeting streamed on Facebook, but containment increased to 21%.

That percentage is an increase from the fire’s containment of 17% reached Tuesday morning, up from 15% Monday.

In a 2:15 p.m. update, officials said crews are “actively building containment lines as the fire backs southward down the slope.” Interior fuels burning also led to fire activity on the northeast side of the fire, the update said.

All of the containment occurred on the east edge of the fire, along U.S. 36. As of 2 p.m. Tuesday, the contained portion is holding.

There are 255 first responders on scene.

An interactive fire map was created for both fires. Residents can input an address and see the fire perimeter in relation to the address as well as measure distance from a location to the fire. It can be found at https://tinyurl.com/y6grcroo.

Most of the containment was made possible by hard work by fire crews as well as a transition into mainly grass-type fuels, planning operations trainee Josh Shroyer said earlier Tuesday in a video update.

“All the hotspots within 100 feet of the line have been completely extinguished, which is why we were able to get that contained,” he said.

Crews on Monday worked to construct fire lines as close to the fire’s edge as possible, and aircraft worked with crews on the ground to construct and mop up fire lines, Troy Hagan, incident commander with the Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team Black, wrote in a Tuesday morning update.

On the fire’s southern edge, firefighters worked to construct a line westward to connect already-burned areas and lighter fuels to the 2003 Overland Fire burn scar.

Crews were to continue constructing firelines and mopping up hot spots today, with aircraft assisting whenever possible.

Fire officials are planning to use Colo. 7 as a northern containment line, Shroyer said, and crews are looking to slowly bring the fire down to the road.

Engines are also patrolling the highway to keep it contained and crews have had good success in using aerial fire retardant to keep it from spreading, Shroyer said.

Crews today also were expected to try to get close to the southern edge of the fire along the Overland burn scar in order to clear out dead trees from the previous fire.

This is a developing story and will be updated.