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University of Colorado Chancellor, Phil DiStefano, ...
Campus officials announced Tuesday that University of Colorado Boulder Chancellor Phil DiStefano has tested positive for COVID-19 and will be isolating at home. (Cliff Grassmick / Staff Photographer)

Campus officials announced Tuesday that University of Colorado Boulder Chancellor Phil DiStefano has tested positive for COVID-19 and will be isolating at home.

According to a CU Boulder news release, DiStefano tested positive Tuesday for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The release said that his daughter also tested positive for the virus.

“Like many others, I have been following public health advice and have taken this pandemic very seriously,” DiStefano said in the release. “Our family’s situation is a reminder of how important it is to continue to follow public health guidance and to get tested.”

DiStefano sought diagnostic testing after he and his family participated in the campus’ monitoring program, open to anyone with a Buff OneCard and their immediate family or household members, according to the release.

Melanie Marquez Parra, CU Boulder director of communications and chief spokesperson, wrote in an email that DiStefano completed a diagnostic test on Tuesday, when he was last on campus.

The chancellor has been experiencing mild symptoms and will continue to isolate at home, according to the release. In an effort to focus on his health, the chancellor will reduce his work schedule.

Parra said that Provost Russ Moore and Interim Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Operating Officer Pat O’Rourke will handle some of the chancellor’s meetings and responsibilities while he is on a reduced schedule.

DiStefano had not been in close contact with any university employees or students before his diagnosis, Parra said.

In the release, DiStefano said he went with his family to participate in the campus monitoring program and is “grateful” he did.

“Without it, we may not have known we needed to complete diagnostic testing,” he said in the release. “We are participating in contact tracing, and I encourage our campus community to use the campus monitoring program. Faculty, staff and students with a Buff OneCard can continue to bring their immediate family and household members to participate.”

Since late November, the campus has offered the saliva-based monitoring tests it used to monitor the health of those living on campus to students, faculty and staff and their immediate family or household members. While officials initially said the expanded monitoring would end Jan. 8, the release stated the availability of monitoring tests for family and household members will continue as long as testing capacity permits.

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