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Richard Wilson, director of the community market at the OUR Center, moves boxes of cookies around on Wednesday. Two Longmont Girl Scout troops donated more than 900 boxes of cookies to the OUR Center as their “Home Town Hero.” (Cliff Grassmick/Staff Photographer)
Richard Wilson, director of the community market at the OUR Center, moves boxes of cookies around on Wednesday. Two Longmont Girl Scout troops donated more than 900 boxes of cookies to the OUR Center as their “Home Town Hero.” (Cliff Grassmick/Staff Photographer)
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Two Longmont Girl Scout troops selected the Our Center as their “Home Town Hero” and delivered hundreds of boxes of cookies to the organization.

“We got two very special deliveries and recognitions last week,” OUR Center Development Director Elaine Klotz said Tuesday in a phone interview.

Longmont Girl Scout Troop 77918 and 77904 donate hundreds of Girl Scout Cookies to the OUR Center in recognition of being a “Home Town Hero.” (OUR Center/Courtesy photo)

Brownie Girl Scout Troop 77904 and Daisy Girl Scout Troop 77918 donated on Friday a total of 935 boxes, or 840 pounds, of various Girl Scout Cookies to the OUR Center as part of their philanthropic recognition of the nonprofit.

According to Girl Scouts of Colorado spokeswoman AnneMarie Harper, the OUR Center was selected as the “Hometown Hero” by two Longmont-based girl scout troops for its efforts to help low-income families in the community.

“The Hometown Heroes program was created so girls would have the opportunity to learn philanthropy and community service through the cookie program,” Harper said in a phone interview Tuesday.

Harper said girls can choose from nonprofit organizations, shelters, firefighters, local military groups, blood banks or food banks as the recipient of the Hometown Hero recognition, which includes pre-purchased orders for donation and leftover cookies from annual sales.

“Recipients simply are ‘heroes’ in the community and a great way for girls to learn about community service in a practical manner,” Harper said.

Klotz said, “Troop 77904 donated 296 pounds and Troop 77918 brought 544 pounds of cookies for our clients and what a real treat this will be for our families we serve that may not otherwise be able to enjoy such a wonderful treat.”

Richard Wilson, director of the community market at the OUR Center, moves boxes of cookies on Wednesday. (Cliff Grassmick/Staff Photographer)

Asked what the recognition from the Girl Scouts meant, Klotz said, “It (this program) really speaks a lot for what the Girl Scout organization as a whole is trying to do, but also especially what their parents and leaders are teaching them, these philanthropic lessons.”

She hoped the lesson in philanthropy is something the girls will carry throughout their lives.

She also said some of the girls considered bringing toiletries next time or offered to check in with elderly neighbors.

“I would just encourage the girls to continue to look for ways they can help — such as helping their neighbor or whatever it is that they’re interested in and passionate about,” Klotz said.