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From left: Bryson Friedman and Maya Cohen hold their noses as they prepare to splash through the falls on the St. Vrain Creek at the Lyons Valley River Park on Monday. Tuesday’s forecast calls for mostly sunny skies with a high of 96, according to the National Weather Service. (Matthew Jonas/Staff Photographer)
From left: Bryson Friedman and Maya Cohen hold their noses as they prepare to splash through the falls on the St. Vrain Creek at the Lyons Valley River Park on Monday. Tuesday’s forecast calls for mostly sunny skies with a high of 96, according to the National Weather Service. (Matthew Jonas/Staff Photographer)
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Boulder melted under a high of 100 degrees Monday, marking it the hottest July 18 to date as measured by the National Weather Service.

Monday’s blistering high in Boulder was reached by 1:30 p.m. and broke the 99-degree NWS record for the date, set in 2020

NWS meteorologist Frank Cooper explained that the heat wave currently roasting the region stems from an area of high pressure, referred to as a ridge, which blocks wind or rain from cooling the area down.

“The ridge of high pressure has really choked off a lot of moisture to the region,” Cooper said. “So we’ll probably see temps in the high 90s the rest of this week as well.”

The NWS had issued a heat advisory for Monday, advising that those who must go outside, particularly to exercise, take appropriate precautions.

“Be prepared when you go outside: have a lot of water, wear loose clothing, and don’t over-exert yourself,” Cooper said. “Those types of things can help alleviate the heat.”

Carrie Haverfield at the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office echoed this recommendation, noting that residents may be more eager to recreate outside when the weather is sunny and warm, but emphasizing that precautions are still necessary.

“We’ll often see people going out for a hike and not bringing enough hydration with them,” she said.

“People should probably think about getting out early in the day when the temperatures are cooler. If they are outside they should be thinking about bringing enough hydration with them… wearing sunscreen, and all that. Go out prepared for higher temperatures even in the early mornings.”

Lindsay Shaw, the Boulder branch owner of Haagen Dazs, 1148 Pearl St., noted that the heat has led to busy days at the store, as those who opt to venture outside seek to cool down.

“We had a record-breaking Sunday,” she said. “People are just so hot and they just want sodas, milkshakes, and malts. … The people who do come in just really want to cool down, so we have the AC on full blast in here.”

While Monday’s high temperature broke the NWS Boulder record for the date, it only tied the record as measured by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA measured a 100-degree high on June 18 in 1988 and 2020. Cooper noted that this disparity may be attributable to the temperature measurements being taken in different locations. Regardless, today’s high still far surpassed NOAA’s 85-degree measurement of a “normal high” for the date.

Tuesday’s forecast called for a high of 96, with a 40% chance of afternoon thunderstorms.

 

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